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Governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear provides updates on COVID-19, Delta Variant

Governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear provides up-to-date information on COVID-19 and state response. Watch live on the video player above. More than three-quarters of Kentucky school districts are expanding mask requirements as one school system to mourn coronavirus-related deaths. Governor Andy Beshear reported Wednesday’s teachers had the fourth highest number of COVID-19 cases per day. The state’s virus-related deaths have increased by another 49, including adolescents aged 32 and 33. In his recent petition for vaccination of Kentucky citizens, he warned that the rapidly spreading delta mutant “can come for you,” regardless of age or health. The South Central Kentucky district has announced that teachers have died as a result of “complications from COVID-19.” The CavernaIndependentSchoolDistrict said in a social media post that it suffered a “catastrophic loss” from the death of high school math. By late Wednesday afternoon, 130 of the state’s 171 public school districts chose to continue requesting masks at school, according to the Kentucky Board of Education Association. A Republican-led parliament in Kentucky last week empowered the school’s board to set a masking policy. Congress has resolved to abolish state-wide mask mandates for public schools. As a result, the state-wide Maskman Date, approved by the State Board of Education, ends on Friday. Beshear encouraged school leaders to maintain a mask wearing policy. The Democratic Governor used Mask’s orders to combat past surges, but legislators blocked his ability to succeed h One-sided behavior Kentucky has a rapidly spreading delta variant virus patient Due to the increased hospitalization, it has become the national virus hotspot with the highest incidence of new cases. 18 years or younger. The state’s virus-related deaths have exceeded 8,140. According to state reports, nearly 2,500 virus patients are hospitalized, occupying almost 91% of the state’s ICU bed. School-age children are infected with the virus at a higher rate than any other age group in Kentucky. -Up to 17 years old is the worst of any age group. The Caberna Independent School District has become a state-of-the-art school system that suffers from virus-related staff deaths. Chris Klein, principal of Caberna High School, said he had not been vaccinated and tested positive for COVID-19 on the weekend before the start of the semester in late August. “Crane said in a telephone interview. The Caberna Board of Education decided on Tuesday to continue demanding that schools wear masks, regardless of vaccination status. The district said masks would be needed until the county remained in the “red zone,” where the incidence of viral cases was high, and remained “red” for at least seven consecutive days. At that point, the issue will be revisited. A school in Lee County, where two staff members died of COVID-19, also announced on Wednesday that it would maintain a universal masking policy for the foreseeable future. The eastern Kentucky district will review the rules in October in hopes of changing policy if the county moves out of the “red zone,” said Sarah Wasson, director of Lee County’s school. The local school board voted on Tuesday to maintain universal masking. “We are now in an era of high incidence and universal masking helping to maintain our face-to-face learning,” Wasson said in a letter posted on social media. .. Meanwhile, in response to the shortage of monoclonal antibody treatments, the state government will oversee the distribution of a maximum number of treatments offered weekly, Bescher said Tuesday. Health care providers in Kentucky will no longer be able to order treatment directly. “I’m worried that some Kentucky people who are hesitant about vaccines may trust monoclonal antibodies,” Bescher said. “What you’re expecting may not be available. There’s nothing available, and no supply issues, but these safe and effective vaccines.” Steven Stack, Kentucky Public Health Commissioner He explained that while the treatment provided, it was a temporary immune boost and did not teach the patient’s body how to make their own antibodies, such as vaccines. “It’s much easier to get vaccinated than to get a monoclonal antibody,” Stack added.

Governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear provides up-to-date information on COVID-19 and the state’s response.

Watch live on the video player above.

More than three-quarters of Kentucky school districts have expanded mask requirements. This is because a school system mourned the death of a coronavirus-related teacher on Wednesday, reporting that the state had the fourth highest total daily number of COVID-19 cases.

Governor Andy Beshear has announced that the state’s virus-related deaths have increased by another 49, including young people aged 32 and 33. In his recent petition for vaccination of Kentucky citizens, he warned that the rapidly spreading delta mutant “can come for you,” regardless of age or health.

The South Central Kentucky district has announced that teachers have died as a result of “complications from COVID-19.” In a social media post, the Caberna Independent School District said it suffered a “catastrophic loss” from the death of high school math. Amanda Nat-sensei.

By late Wednesday afternoon, 130 of the state’s 171 public school districts chose to continue requesting masks at school, according to the Kentucky Board of Education Association.

A Republican-led legislature in Kentucky last week empowered the school board to set a district masking policy. The legislature has resolved to abolish state-wide mask mandates for public schools. As a result, the state-wide Maskman Date, approved by the State Board of Education, ends on Friday.

Beshear encourages school leaders to maintain a mask-wearing policy and calls it “one right answer” to protect students and staff and keep schools open. The Democratic governor used Maskman Date to combat past surges, but lawmakers blocked his ability to take such unilateral actions.

Kentucky has become the national virus hotspot with the highest incidence of new cases, as the rapidly prevailing delta variant has increased hospitalization for viral patients.

The state on Wednesday reported 5,398 cases of the new virus, including 1,530 cases under the age of 18 in Kentucky. The state’s virus-related deaths have exceeded 8,140. The state reports that about 2,500 virus patients are hospitalized and occupy almost 91% of the state’s ICU beds.

School-aged children are infected with the virus at a higher rate than any other age group in Kentucky, but the state-wide immunization rate for 12 to 17 years is the lowest of any age group.

The Caverna Independent School has become a modern school system that suffers from virus-related staff deaths. Chris Klein, principal of Caberna High School, said Wednesday that Nat had not been vaccinated and tested positive for COVID-19 on the weekend before the start of the semester in late August.

“I was loved and cherished by my students. She always wanted the best for her students,” Crane said in a telephone interview.

Caverna’s school board decided on Tuesday to continue to require masks to be worn at school, regardless of vaccination status. The district said masks would be needed until the county remained in the “red zone,” where the incidence of viral cases was high, and remained “red” for at least seven consecutive days. At that point, the issue will be reviewed.

A school in Lee County, where two staff members died of COVID-19, also announced on Wednesday that it would maintain a universal masking policy for the foreseeable future. The eastern Kentucky district will review the rules in October in hopes of changing policy if the county moves out of the “red zone,” said Sarah Wasson, director of Lee County’s school. The local school board voted on Tuesday to maintain universal masking.

“We are now in an era of high incidence and universal masking helping to maintain our face-to-face learning,” Wasson said in a letter posted on social media. ..

Meanwhile, in response to the shortage of monoclonal antibody treatments, the state government will oversee the distribution of a maximum number of treatments offered weekly, Bescher said Tuesday. Health care providers in Kentucky will no longer be able to order treatment directly.

“I’m worried that some Kentucky people who are hesitant about vaccines may trust monoclonal antibodies,” Bescher said. “What you’re expecting may not be available. There’s nothing available, and no supply issues, these safe and effective vaccines.”

Dr. Steven Stack, a public health commissioner in Kentucky, explained that while treatment provides temporary immune enhancement, it does not teach the patient’s body how to make their own antibodies, such as vaccines.

β€œIt’s much easier to get vaccinated than to get a monoclonal antibody,” Stack added.

Governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear provides updates on COVID-19, Delta Variant

Source link Governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear provides updates on COVID-19, Delta Variant

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