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Hatching of a rare double-headed turtle in a barnstable nesting site

Rare twins have recently hatched in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, according to local wildlife hospitals and education centers. The Cape Wildlife Center shared on a social media page on Sunday afternoon that diamondback terrapins hatched from a protected nesting site in Barnstable. He was taken to the hospital by a member of the Barnstable Natural Resources Department. Freshly hatched turtles have a condition called bicepali, a rare abnormality that can arise from both genetic and environmental factors that affect the embryo during development. Like conjoined twins, turtles share parts. They have some of their bodies and also independent. In this case, they have two heads and six legs. When the newly hatched turtles were admitted to the Cape Wildlife Center, both sides of the turtle were very careful and active, and both sides remained bright and active with a little over two weeks of hospital care. They’re swimming and gaining weight. It’s impossible to get into their minds, but they seem to be working together to navigate the environment, “the Cape Wildlife Center wrote. increase. Although they always survive very long or have a good quality of life, Cape Wildlife officials say they give reasons for optimism about freshly hatched turtles. Hospital workers observed that the head controlled each of the three legs while on the move and while swimming. Related Video: A 600-pound leatherback turtle was rescued and announced at Cape Cod. A barium study revealed that each head has its own gastrointestinal tract. The right side appears to be a little developed, but both sides are feeding and digesting. Monitored deep-sea swimming tests have shown that both sides of a freshly hatched turtle can be adjusted to reach the surface and breathe when needed. There’s still a lot to learn about them, and our next step is to get a CT scan when they’re a little bigger. This gives us more information about the internal structure they share, “the Cape Wildlife Center writes.

A rare double-headed turtle that recently hatched in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, according to local wildlife hospitals and education centers.

Cape Wildlife Center That social media page Diamondback terrapins hatched from a protected barnstable nesting site on Sunday afternoon and were taken to the hospital by members of the Barnstable Natural Resources Department.

Freshly hatched turtles have a condition known as biceps, a rare abnormality that can arise from both genetic and environmental factors that affect the embryo during development.

Like conjoined twins, turtles share part of their body and have independent parts. In this case, it has two heads and six legs.

When the newly hatched turtle was admitted to the Cape Wildlife Center, both sides of the turtle were very careful and active. And during a little over two weeks of hospital care, both sides remain bright and lively.

“They eat, swim and gain weight every day. It’s impossible to get into their minds, but they seem to work together to navigate the environment.” Cape Wildlife Center wrote..

Biceps animals don’t always live longer or have a better quality of life, but Cape Wildlife officials say they give reasons for new hatching animals to be optimistic. rice field.

So far, x-rays have revealed that the newly hatched pups have two spines that fuse further down the body. Hospital workers observed that the head showed control of three legs each while on the move and while swimming.

Related Video: A 600-pound leatherback turtle was rescued and released in Cape Cod

Barium studies have revealed that each head has its own gastrointestinal tract. The right side appears to be a little more developed, but both sides are eating and digesting.

Supervised deep-sea swimming tests have shown that both sides of a freshly hatched turtle can be adjusted to reach the surface and breathe when needed.

“There’s still a lot to learn about them. The next step is to get a CT scan when they’re a little bigger, which gives us more information about the internal structure they share,” Cape said. Wildlife Center writes.



Hatching of a rare double-headed turtle in a barnstable nesting site

Source link Hatching of a rare double-headed turtle in a barnstable nesting site

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