Health

Lima Public Library Book Review

fiction

William McKilvanie’s “Ruins of Darkness”

Attorney Bobby Carter has done a lot of work for the wrong kind of people. When his body is found in an alley behind a pub known to be under the protective wings of a local criminal boss, the fragile equilibrium that has kept Glasgow relatively safe for months collapses. increase. In addition to a distraught family and many strong friends, Carter left his fair share of the enemy. So who is responsible for his death?

Husband by Chandler Baker

Nora Spangler is a successful lawyer, but when it comes to family life, she packs lunch, schedules doctor appointments, knows where to find extra rolls of paper towels, and designs and orders holiday cards. .. Her husband is also working hard … but why does she always seem to work so hard?

Jenny McCarthy’s fugitive

Like recent college graduates, Jona Winters doesn’t know what’s going to happen next. A young black American who grew up in France and lives in New York City, he tried several careers to realize that nothing felt right. And because Jonah is having a hard time imagining her future, she feels pressure from friends and family to prioritize the hardships of her community before looking for herself.

Sae Yamamoto Hayes Home Front Girls

Rita Vincenzo received her first letter from Glory Whitehall in January 1943. Glory is a young effervescent mother from New England who is impulsive and bird-free. Rita is the wife of a Midwestern professor, loves gardening, and has a generous and old soul. These two women have nothing in common, except for one strong bond. The men they love are fighting war in a world far from home.

Non-Fiction

End of Bias: Beginning: Science and Practice to Overcome Unconscious Bias by Jessica Nodel

Unconscious Prejudice: Permanent, unintentional prejudiced behavior that conflicts with our consciously held beliefs. We know it exists and can even have corrosive and deadly effects. We see it in medicine, workplace, education, police and more. But when it comes to eradicating prejudice, there is still a long way to go.

The Secret History of Food: A Strange But True Story about the Origin of Everything We Eat by Matt Siegel

The secret history of food is a rich and satisfying quest for the historical, cultural, scientific, sexual and, of course, culinary subcultures of this most important area. Siegel is not a chef’s knife, but an armchair Anthony Bourdain with knowledge gained from medieval food-related manuscripts, ancient Chinese scrolls, and ambiguous cooking diaries. This entertaining and fascinating book is a must read for all foodies.

The Devil You Know: The Story of Human Cruelty and Compassion by Gwen Adshed

What drives someone into terrible violence? Dr. Gwen Adshed offers fresh and amazing insights into violence and the mind from 30 years of experience with people who have committed serious crimes. Through a collaboration with co-author Eileen Horn, Dr. Adhead brings her extraordinary career to life with a series of unwavering portraits.

Good Anxiety: Utilizing the Most Misunderstood Emotional Power by Dr. Wendy Suzuki

We live in times of anxiety. It often feels trapped in a never-ending cycle of stress, insomnia and anxiety. But what if there was a way to use anxiety to solve problems and enhance happiness? What if you could recognize anxiety as a unique gift rather than seeing it as a curse?

for children

World Book Robot (Series)

In 2021, the future is now! Robots are around us and do all sorts of work that was once done only by humans or dreamed of what we could do. Robots can move to places where humans cannot go, such as active volcanoes, disaster areas, minefields, and outer space. It can also be moved to the human body. Check out the sheer number of jobs robots are doing in this exciting new series of world books. There are lots of great pictures of robots of all shapes, sizes and abilities pretending to be theirs. The titles of the series are: Robot basics, robots: sensing and execution. Robots: Thinking and learning; Moving robots; Working robots; Playing robots; Moving robots; Supporting robots; Robots and humans and strange robots.

Age: 9-13



Lima Public Library Book Review

Source link Lima Public Library Book Review

Related Articles

Back to top button