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Surfside family, victims get at least $ 150 million

Video above: 97 surfside condo collapse victims identified. A Florida judge said lost victims and their families would initially receive at least $ 150 million in compensation as the remaining rubble from the collapse of a 12-story oceanfront condominium was cleared on Wednesday. It was. Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Michael Handsman said in a hearing that he earned at least $ 100 million from the $ 1 million insurance on the Champlain Towers South Building and the sale of the surfside property where the building once stood. Said. The judge added that the group includes not only condominium owners, but also visitors and lessors. “Their rights are protected.” $ 150 million does not count revenue from numerous proceedings filed since the collapse of June 24, which killed at least 97 people. The judge said these proceedings were integrated into a single class proceeding that would be subject to all victims and their families at their option. As a result, 97 victims have been identified so far, many of whom use DNA analysis. Miami-Dade officials said Wednesday night that they believed they had two more casualties, but another person’s name was announced later that day. In other words, there may be only one more person. Authorities have not yet announced the end of recovery efforts. Mayor Daniella Levine Cava said the tragedy scene was mostly cleared up, the wreckage was moved to an evidence gathering site near the airport, and a thorough search continued “with great care and diligence.” Search by Wednesday statement. “The enormous pressure of the weight of the collapse and the passage of time also make it more difficult,” she said, stressing that workers were still carefully examining the rubble for the remaining victims and personal belongings. Police said Wednesday that 24-year-old Anastasia Gromova and Linda March, 58, had been identified. A Canadian from Montreal, Gromova visited a condo for his friend Michelle Pazos and his last hurray on an English teaching program in Japan. Gromova’s body was recovered three days ago and was one of the last to be identified. Her sad family rushed from Canada after the collapse and waited in Miami for weeks in pain. “At least for now, we can move on,” her sister Anna Gromova told The Associated Press, explaining that her sister was a bright star that plummeted. “We remember her forever.” Her parents said she was cheerful, always on the go, always smiling, and not afraid to take on difficult challenges. “It’s hard because I knew I could prevent losses, but I couldn’t prevent anything,” she said. The body in March recovered on July 5. Earlier this year, a successful lawyer rented a furnished penthouse. There, a photo of a white bunk bed hanging erratically near a cut-out building became a national topic. According to a friend, he was divorced and was looking for a new start in Miami. Important evidence of rubble is stored in a warehouse in the Miami area, and the rest is stored in a nearby vacant lot, said recipient lawyer Michael Goldberg. According to recipients who are processing finances on behalf of condominiums, the National Institute of Standards and Technology has led the federal investigation to collapse, all possible for proceedings and other experts to consider. He said it would be preserved as evidence. “It may take years before their report is published,” Goldberg said of the NIST investigation. When the building collapsed, the building had undergone a recertification process for just 40 years. It happened three years after the engineer warned about a serious structural problem that needed immediate attention. Construction work such as concrete repair has not yet begun, and there remains disagreement among condominium owners on what to do. Some want to rebuild the entire condo and come back, while others say it should be left as a monument to honor the deceased. The third suggestion is to combine both. Owner Reisa Rodriguez, who had the unit on the ninth floor, said she couldn’t imagine returning to the building where many of her friends died. “I didn’t personally step into the building. It’s a graveyard,” Rodriguez told the judge. “I wake up in the middle of the night thinking of everyone who died,” said Oren Citrine Baum, a lawyer who informally represents some condominium owners, whether additional requirements can be added. He said it was important to think creatively about the sale of the building. As a kind of memorial for future developers. “It shouldn’t be a traditional land sale,” Cytrynbaum said. “We are not on one path,” but Huntsman said time is important because victims and their families need money to begin rebuilding their lives. He said. Associated Press writer Kerry Kennedy contributed to this report from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Video above: 97 surfside condominium collapse victims have been identified.Authorities believe there is another

As the remaining rubble from Collapse of a 12-story oceanfront condominium A Florida judge said it was cleared up on Wednesday Victims and family Those who suffer a loss will initially receive compensation of at least $ 150 million.

Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Michael Handsman said in a hearing that the amount was at least $ 100 million in insurance for the Champlain Towers South Building and the sale of the surfside property that once had the building. Said that the income was included.

“The court’s concerns have always been victims here,” the judge said, adding that the group included visitors and lessors as well as condo owners. “Their rights are protected.”

$ 150 million does not count revenue from numerous proceedings filed since the collapse of June 24, which killed at least 97 people. The judge said these proceedings were integrated into a single class proceeding that would cover all victims and their families if they chose.

“There is no doubt that no stones will be left behind,” Handsman said of the proceedings.

So far 97 victims identified, Many of them use DNA analysis. Miami-Dade officials said Wednesday night that they believed they had two more casualties, but another person’s name was announced later that day.

Authorities have not yet announced the end of their recovery efforts.

Meanwhile, Mayor Daniella Levine Cava said the tragedy scene had been largely cleared, the wreckage was moved to an evidence gathering site near the airport, and thorough investigations continued “with great care and diligence.” It was.

She talked about the difficulty of searching in a statement on Wednesday.

“The immense pressure of the weight of the collapse and the passage of time also makes it more difficult,” she said, and workers are still carefully examining rubble and personal property and religious relics for the remaining victims. I emphasized that.

On Wednesday, police said 24-year-old Anastasia Gromova and Linda March, 58, had been identified.

Gromova, a Canadian from Montreal, had just been accepted into a program to teach English in Japan and was visiting a condo for his friend Michelle Pazos and his last hurray. Gromova’s body was recovered three days ago and was one of the last confirmed.

Her sad family rushed from Canada after the collapse and waited in Miami for weeks in pain.

“It makes it realistic and difficult, but at different levels. At least now we can move on,” her sister Anna Gromova told The Associated Press, and her sister plunged brightly. I explained that it was a star. “We remember her forever.”

Her parents said she was cheerful, always on the go, always smiling, and not afraid to take on difficult challenges.

“It’s difficult because I knew that loss could be prevented, but nothing was prevented,” her sister said.

According to police, the body in March was recovered on July 5. Earlier this year, a successful lawyer rented a furnished penthouse. There, a photo of a white bunk bed hanging erratically near a cut-out building became a national headline.

(David Santiago / Miami Herald via AP)

Debris hangs from Champlain Towers South Condo after a partial collapse of a skyscraper in Surfside, Florida, Thursday, June 24, 2021 (David Santiago / Miami Herald via AP)

According to a friend, March was said to be an extrovert, losing both his parents and sister in the last decade, divorcing and looking for a new start in Miami.

Important evidence of rubble is stored in a warehouse in the Miami area, and the rest is stored in a nearby vacant lot, said recipient lawyer Michael Goldberg. All of that will be preserved as possible evidence for proceedings and other experts to consider, he said.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology is leading a federal investigation into the collapse, according to recipients who are processing finances on behalf of the condominium board.

“It may take years for their report to be published,” Goldberg said of the NIST investigation.

When the building collapsed, the building had undergone just 40 years of recertification process. It happened three years after the engineer warned about a serious structural problem that needed immediate attention. Most of the concrete repairs and other work had not yet begun.

There remains disagreement among condominium owners about what to do with the site. Some want to rebuild the entire condo and come back, while others say it should be left as a monument to honor the deceased. The third suggestion is to combine both.

Owner Reisa Rodriguez, whose unit was on the ninth floor, said she couldn’t imagine returning to the building where many of her friends died.

“I never personally set foot in the building. It’s a graveyard,” Rodriguez told the judge. “I wake up in the middle of the night and think of everyone who died.”

Oren Citrine Baum, a lawyer who informally represents the owner of the condominium, thinks creatively about the sale of the building, including whether any monumental or other requirements will be added for future developers. Said that it was important.

“It shouldn’t be a traditional land sale,” Cytrynbaum said. “We are not on one path.”

But Mr Handsman said time is important because it takes money for victims and their families to begin rebuilding their lives.

“This is not the case when there is time to grow grass underneath,” he said.

Associated Press writer Kerry Kennedy contributed to this report from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Surfside family, victims get at least $ 150 million

Source link Surfside family, victims get at least $ 150 million

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