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Thanksgiving Day to Mourn Massachusetts Indigenous Peoples

Hundreds of people enjoyed Saturday’s Thanksgiving parade in Plymouth, Massachusetts, and a group of indigenous people protested the holiday celebration. “Plymouth is rich in history, but there is no Indian truth,” said Brian Weeden, chairman of the Wampanoag tribe in Massachusetts. Since 1970, the Wampanoag have declared Thanksgiving a national day to mourn the loss of indigenous lives, culture and land. “Our presence here is reminiscent of the true story of Thanksgiving, with classrooms, history books and celebrations across the country,” he said. “We will never forget the atrocities that have fallen upon our people as a result of their violent trespassing.” To this day, the Wampanoag continue to fight the federal government over land. .. Our tribes are still fighting for the little land we have — we own half of the territory of our ancestors — and 400 years later we I don’t really appreciate it, “Weden said. You can’t change the past, but you can change the future. ” “And the way we change the future is to educate people and start to understand that this is not a celebration day. This is a mourning day.”

A group of indigenous people protested the holiday celebration when hundreds of people enjoyed Saturday’s Thanksgiving parade in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Brian Weeden, chairman of the Mashpie Wampanoag tribe, said:

“Plymouth is rich in history, but not the truth of the Indians,” said Ponkapoag Praying Indian Chief Ladybugs.

Since 1970, the Wampanoag have declared Thanksgiving as a National Day to mourn the loss of indigenous life, culture and land.

“Our presence here is a clear reminder of the true story of Thanksgiving and is very different from the legendary stories shared in the country’s classrooms, history books and celebrations,” Weeden said. Says. “We will never forget the atrocities that have fallen upon our people as a result of their violent trespassing.”

To date, the Wampanoag have been fighting the federal government for land.

“Here we are celebrating Thanksgiving. The fact that our tribes are still fighting for just a little bit of our land-we are one of our ancestral territories. I own half of the%-and 400 years later, we don’t have much thank you. “

“Well, you can’t change the past, but you can change the future,” said Ladybugs. “And the way we change the future is to educate people and start to understand that this is not a celebration day. This is a mourning day.”

Thanksgiving Day to Mourn Massachusetts Indigenous Peoples

Source link Thanksgiving Day to Mourn Massachusetts Indigenous Peoples

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