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Will parents immediately vaccinate their infants against COVID-19?This is what I found in one survey

The COVID-19 vaccine may soon be available to young children, and public health leaders say vaccination may help end the pandemic, but in fact the vaccine Only if you have been vaccinated. According to a study released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation, their young children will not be vaccinated immediately. If the agency needs to recommend a Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine aged 5-11 years. Approximately 28 million children have been vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine, and pediatricians and pharmacies are already preparing to administer shots, but studies show that among parents of children aged 5 to 11 years, children Only 27% said they would be vaccinated. Despite increasing evidence that the Pfizer vaccine is safe and effective for these young children, the numbers have remained about the same since July. The vaccine has already been approved for children over the age of 12 and teens. In September, Pfizer announced the first results of a trial showing that the vaccine produces a “strong” antibody response at ages 5-11. Researchers at the Kaiser Family Foundation have little effect on persuading parents to vaccinate their children immediately. Since then, Pfizer has provided more positive evidence for the COVID-19 vaccine. Pfizer said in a document posted last week that the vaccine is safe and 90.7% effective against symptomatic COVID-19 in infants. The US Food and Drug Administration also benefits from vaccination of infants in a variety of scenarios. Since it took place from October 14th to 24th, not all parents surveyed are fully aware of this additional safety bulletin. Parents seem to be most concerned about the safety of the vaccine. About 76% of those surveyed are “very” or “somewhat” concerned about long-term side effects, and 71% are concerned about serious side effects. More and more people seem to believe in the myth that vaccines can affect fertility. About 66% of those surveyed said they were worried. The effect of the vaccine on the future fertility of the child. In January of this year, only 3% of adults who responded to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s survey of vaccine hesitation heard or believed that vaccines adversely affect fertility. There is no evidence that any of the COVID-19 vaccines cause fertility problems. According to the CDC, some parents may not even believe that their child needs a vaccine. Although proportionally fewer children die or are hospitalized due to COVID-19 than adults, at least 745 children have died from COVID-19 in the United States since the onset of the pandemic. Thousands of children are hospitalized, according to the CDC. Even with mild COVID-19, children can be affected in the long term. “It’s a good idea to vaccinate children,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, told CNN. From a statistical point of view, if a child becomes infected, it is very likely that it will not have serious consequences compared to an elderly person like me or someone with an underlying disorder, but it is exempt from the child. It doesn’t mean that all you need to do is go to pediatric hospitals across the country, especially with delta variants, which are much more likely to be infected, and more children will be infected. I know I have some serious illnesses. It is also important to reduce the spread of the disease. “There are really good reasons to get children vaccinated,” Fauci said. Fauci hopes that public health efforts for parents can convince their children to be vaccinated. For those whose parents want their small children to be vaccinated, the study may have one silver lining. First look at how the vaccine works for other children. The results are in line with the July survey, which is not difficult. A health equity officer at Rutgers New Jersey Medical College told CNN on Wednesday. “We need to make sure that parents understand that the cumulative benefits of vaccination outweigh the potential risks, and for children in schools, pharmacies, and pediatrician offices. Vaccines need to be readily available. ”

The COVID-19 vaccine may soon be available to young children, and public health leaders say vaccination of them can end the pandemic.

New research suggests that it is uncertain at best.

According to a study released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the majority of parents say they will not immediately vaccinate their younger children.

“Immediately” could be as early as next week for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccine adviser to discuss whether to recommend a Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine aged 5-11 years. Approximately 28 million children are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine, and pediatricians and pharmacies are already preparing to administer shots.

However, according to a survey, only 27% of parents of children aged 5 to 11 said they would be vaccinated against the virus as soon as the vaccine became available.

Despite increasing evidence that the Pfizer vaccine is safe and effective for these young children, the numbers have remained about the same since July. The vaccine has already been approved for children over the age of 12 and teens.

of September, Pfizer has published the first results of a trial showing that the vaccine causes a “strong” antibody response at ages 5-11 years.

According to researchers at the Kaiser Family Foundation, the news seemed to have “little effect” on persuading parents to vaccinate their children immediately.

Since then, Pfizer has provided more positive evidence for its COVID-19 vaccine.so Posted document Pfizer said last week that the vaccine was safe and 90.7% effective against symptomatic COVID-19 in young children.

The US Food and Drug Administration also said that the benefits of vaccination of young children appear to outweigh the risks under various scenarios.

The poll was conducted from October 14th to 24th, so not all parents surveyed are fully aware of this additional safety information.

Parents seemed most worried about the safety of the vaccine.

Approximately 76% of those surveyed said they were “very” or “slightly” concerned about long-term side effects, and 71% said they were concerned about serious side effects.

It seems that more and more people are believing in the myth that vaccines can affect childbirth.

About 66% of those surveyed say they are worried about the impact of the vaccine on their children’s future childbirth. In January of this year, only 3% of adults who responded to the Kaiser Family Foundation survey on vaccine hesitation heard or believed that the vaccine had a negative effect on childbirth.

According to, there is no evidence that any of the COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility problems. CDC..

Some parents may not even believe that their child needs a vaccine. Although proportionally fewer children die or are hospitalized due to COVID-19 than adults, at least 745 children have died from COVID-19 in the United States since the onset of the pandemic.According to, thousands of children were hospitalized CDC.. Children can also be long-term affected, even with mild COVID-19.

“It’s a good idea to vaccinate children,” Dr. Anthony Forch, director of the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, told CNN.

“From a statistical point of view, if a child is infected, it is very likely that it will not have serious consequences compared to older people like me or people with underlying illnesses, but it is because the child has a child. It doesn’t mean that just going to pediatric hospitals across the country will exempt you from serious illness, especially with the delta variant, which is much more likely to be infected, because you will find that more children are infected. “

Vaccination of children is also important to reduce the spread of the disease, Forch said.

“There are really good reasons to vaccinate children,” Fauci said.

Fauci hopes that public health efforts on parents will be able to convince their children to be vaccinated.

For those whose parents want to vaccinate their small children, the study may have one silver lining: about one-third of which is the first vaccine in the other child. He said “wait and see” to see if it works. The results are in line with the July survey, which is not difficult.

Dr. Chris Parnell, Health Disparity Officer at Rutgers New Jersey Medical College, told CNN Wednesday. “We need to make sure that parents understand that the cumulative benefits of vaccination outweigh the potential risks, and for children in schools, pharmacies, and pediatrician offices. Vaccines need to be readily available. “

Will parents immediately vaccinate their infants against COVID-19?This is what I found in one survey

Source link Will parents immediately vaccinate their infants against COVID-19?This is what I found in one survey

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