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Word of mouth spreads photos of people on Florida’s monoclonal antibody therapy site

The scene at a major public library in Jacksonville, Florida was memorable, recalls Ruy Lopez. Waiting for COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatment, he saw people so ill and unbearable. “These people were terrible and terrible,” he said. His experience on Wednesday at the library set up by the state as a place of treatment is even more grateful that he was fully vaccinated. “I lost two cousins ​​at COVID in San Diego,” he told CNN in an interview. “If I hadn’t been vaccinated, it would definitely have taken me away.” Lopez had been ill with COVID-19 for over a week and had symptoms such as glandular swelling and runny nose. When persistent migraine headaches worsened, he and many other Floridians applied for a promise to receive monoclonal antibody treatment, which he recently heard advertised by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis. “Don’t wait until you need to be hospitalized,” DeSantis said Wednesday while visiting a facility in West Palm Beach. “Do it fast, get in, people do well, obviously don’t leave the hospital, but it resolves the symptoms of many people very quickly, they feel much better, probably not at the hospital level at first. But they felt the symptom, this is really a great opportunity to solve it and I think it will be solved in a good way. “Lopez arrives at the library just before he is scheduled for noon. And he said he spent more than two hours with dozens of others, Lopez told CNN on Thursday. “Over time, more people began to appear, and it became clear that they were bringing in and making reservations. Some of the incoming people were really ill,” Lopez said. Told CNN on Thursday. .. One woman in a line waiting for treatment at the library was so ill that she couldn’t even stand, Lopez said. She couldn’t stand it, so he crawls up the wall, he said. It was cold, so the staff provided the patient with a paper gown. According to Lopez, one was given a wheelchair because he couldn’t move, Lopez said. “Not only that, but also its seriousness.” Libraries are usually places of loneliness and silence. But on Wednesday, Lopez described the persistent sounds of crying and painful moans from people seeking treatment. “When I die for COVID, I’m not only alone, but I feel a lot of pain. That really shows that to me.” His wife Sae Yamamoto took a picture of him on Reddit during his stay. The line that shared the photos. By looking at and listening to the library site, she pushed things from end to end, saying the whole trial was stressful. “You don’t have to do that,” she said. “People don’t have to be so ill,” Lopez said, who began to have headaches only after receiving monoclonal antibody treatment and acknowledged the work of the staff managing the treatment. .. Everything is new. It was a new situation. Everything was chaotic. But they were absolutely great, so I put them on my hat, “he said. The location of Jacksonville is one of Florida’s eight state-sponsored sites. ..

The scene at a major public library in Jacksonville, Florida was memorable, recalls Ruy Lopez.When he was waiting for COVID-19 Monoclonal antibody therapy, He saw people so sick and unbearable.

“These people were in bad, bad condition,” he said. His experience at the library, which the state set up as a place of treatment on Wednesday, shows that he is even more grateful. Completely vaccinated..

“I lost two cousins ​​to COVID in San Diego,” he told CNN in an interview. “There is no doubt that it would have taken me away if I had not been vaccinated.”

Lopez has been infected with COVID-19 for over a week and has symptoms such as glandular swelling and runny nose. When persistent migraine headaches worsened, he applied for a promise to receive monoclonal antibody treatment, which he and many other Floridians have recently heard advertised by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.

“Don’t wait until you need to be hospitalized,” DeSantis said. Said on wednesday While visiting West Palm Beach facilities. “Do it fast, get in, people do well, obviously don’t leave the hospital, but it resolves the symptoms of many people very quickly, they feel much better, probably not at the hospital level at first. But they felt the symptom, this is really a great opportunity to solve it and I think it will be solved in a good way. “

Lopez said he arrived at the library shortly before his noon appointment and spent more than two hours with dozens of other people waiting for treatment.

Lopez told CNN on Thursday. “As time went on, more people began to appear, and it became clear that they were bringing in and making promises.

Waiting for treatment in the library

According to Lopez, one woman in the line was ill and couldn’t stand it. She couldn’t stand it, so he crawls up the wall, he said. It was cold, so the staff provided the patient with a paper gown. According to Lopez, one was given a wheelchair because he couldn’t move.

“It really made it really clear and revealed its severity,” Lopez said. “Not only that, but also its seriousness.”

Libraries are usually places of loneliness and silence. But on Wednesday, Lopez explained the persistent sounds of crying and painful moans from some of the people seeking treatment.

“At that time, I actually thought,’This is when I read that this kills,'” he said. “When I die for COVID, I feel a lot of pain, not just being alone. That really shows that to me.”

His wife, Sae Yamamoto, shared on Reddit the photos he took while in line. Seeing and hearing the scene in the library pushed things from end to end for her, saying that the whole trial was stressful.

“You don’t have to do that,” she said. “People don’t have to be so ill.”

Lopez said he began to have headaches only after receiving monoclonal antibody treatment, recognizing the credit of the staff managing the treatment.

“They were doing their best in their current state. Everything is new. It was a new situation. Everything was chaotic. But they were absolutely great, so I put on them a hat.” He said.

The location of Jackson Building Sponsored by 8 states Florida site.

Word of mouth spreads photos of people on Florida’s monoclonal antibody therapy site

Source link Word of mouth spreads photos of people on Florida’s monoclonal antibody therapy site

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