Ohio

Do You Know Ohio’s Official State Symbols? Here Are the Tree, Flower, and More!

Most states in the country have their own symbols, such as state flags, songs, flowers, birds, and more. These symbols celebrate each state’s history, nature, and unique qualities, helping to tell the story of its residents.

State Flag of Ohio

The official flag of Ohio was adopted on May 9, 1902. Unlike other states, Ohio’s flag is a “swallow-tailed burgee” rather than a rectangular flag. The triangles on the flag represent hills and valleys, while the stripes symbolize roads and waterways. The 13 stars commemorate the original 13 states of the Union.

Ohio State Flower

The red carnation became Ohio’s state flower in 1904. It was chosen in honor of President William McKinley, who was known for wearing red carnations in his buttonholes.

Ohio State Bird

Ohio’s state bird is the cardinal. In the 1600s, cardinals were rare in the state due to the dense forests. As the forests were cleared, the cardinal population grew.

Ohio State Tree

The Ohio Buckeye is the state tree, designated in 1953. The nuts resemble the shape and color of a deer’s eye. Ohioans have long called themselves “Buckeyes,” a nickname also used for The Ohio State University’s mascot.

Ohio State Mammal

The white-tailed deer has been Ohio’s state mammal since 1988. These animals have been in Ohio since the last Ice Age and have historically provided food, clothing, and tools.

Ohio State Insect

The ladybug was named the state insect in 1975. Found in every county, ladybugs help keep crops and plants healthy by eating pests. The Ohio General Assembly’s resolution describes the ladybug as symbolic of the people of Ohio: proud, friendly, industrious, and hardy, bringing delight to children and contributing significantly to nature.

The Ohio State Pet

One of the most heartwarming symbols is the state pet, designated in 2019. The state pet of Ohio is the shelter pet, chosen to raise awareness about homeless and adoptable pets.

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